University of Chicago Studies Treatment Options to Restore Natural Heartbeat Possible for Heart Failure Patients

May 11, 2019 | Cardiovascular, Cardiovascular Trial, CV, University of Chicago

cardiovascular

Research led by the University of Chicago Medicine showcases a new therapy to re-engage the heart’s natural electrical pathways rather than bypassing them. The implications point toward more treatment options for heart failure patients who additionally are afflicted with electrical disturbances, such as arrhythmias.

In his SYNC trial, a novel pilot study, researchers compared the effectiveness of two different cardiac resynchronization therapies—alternatively or treatments to correct irregularities in the heartbeat through implanted pacemakers and defibrillators.

Today the standard of care is known as biventricular pacing—using two pacing impulses in both lower chambers.  Alternatively, this more recent approach known as His bundle pacing, seeks to work toward engaging and restoring the heart’s natural physiology.  Never have these two approaches been compared in a clinical trial.

Involving 40 adult patients across seven institutions in the Midwest, the University of Chicago Medicine group served as the independent coordinating site.  The team presented the results at the Heart Rhythm Society’s annual scientific sessions in San Francisco May 9, 2019.

Roderick Tung, MD, FHRS, Director of the Cardiac Electrophysiology & EP Laboratories at the University of Chicago Medicine noted “this is the first prospective study in our field to compare outcomes between different ways to achieve cardiac resynchronization.” He continued “through His bundle pacing, we’re trying to tap into the normal wiring of the heart and restore conduction the way nature intended. Previously we have just accepted that we had to bypass it through pacing two ventricles at a time.”

Lead Research/Investigator

Roderick Tung, MD, FHRS, Director of the Cardiac Electrophysiology & EP Laboratories at the University of Chicago Medicine

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