Trial Watch: Novo Nordisk’s Liraglutide Significantly Reduces Major Cardiac Events in Elderly

Dec 5, 2018 | Cardiovascular, CV, Diabetes, Diabetes Type 2, Liraglutide, Positive Results

Cardiac Health

Liraglutide is marketed under the brand name Victoza, it is an injectable drug developed by Novo Nordisk for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In 2015, Novo Nordisk began marketing a separate strength in the U.S. and E.U. under the brand name Saxenda as a treatment for adults who are obese or overweight with at least one weight-related comorbid condition.  Liraglutide is a derivative of a human incretin (metabolic hormone), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) that is used as a long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, binding the same receptors as does the endogenous metabolic hormone GLP-1 that stimulates insulin secretion. The product was approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in 2009 and by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) January 2010. More recently it was approved by the FDA in 2014 and the EMA 2015 for adults with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or greater (obesity) or a BMI of 27 or greater (overweight) who have at least one weight-related condition.

Now new evidence being generated from the LEADER (Liraglutide Effect and Action in Diabetes: Evaluation of Cardiovascular Outcome Results) trial reveals that older patients treater with Liraglutide demonstrated significantly decreased risks for major adverse cardiovascular events and all-cause death as recently reported by commercial sponsor Novo Nordisk in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Matthew P. Gilbert, DO, MPH, associate professor at Larner College of Medicine at The University of Vermont and colleagues recently conducted a post hoc analysis of the LEADER trial to determine the cardiovascular effect of liraglutide in patients aged 75 years or older and 60 to 74 with Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, compared with placebo.  Regardless of treatment, patients aged 75 years or older experienced more major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) than those aged 60 to 74 years. There was a 34% risk reduction in the frequency of MACEs and a 29% risk reduction in the frequency of expanded MACE outcomes among patients aged 75 years or older treated with liraglutide compared with those treated with placebo.

Regardless of age, fewer other CV outcomes occurred in the liraglutide group than the placebo group. Follow the link to the Healio article authored by Alaina Tedesco. It is important to note that Matthew Gilbert did receive fees from Sanofi and Novo Nordisk.

Lead Research/Investigator

Matthew P. Gilbert, DO, MPH, associate professor at Larner College of Medicine at The University of Vermont

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