Thomas Jefferson University Study Highlights Smoking & Head and Neck Cancer Danger

Aug 10, 2019 | Cancer, Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Oncology, Smoking/ Second Hand Smoke

In a Secure High Level Laboratory Scientists in a Coverall Conducting a Research. Chemist Adjusts Samples in a Petri Dish with Pincers.

Thomas Jefferson University researchers investigating cigarette smoking effects on tumor progression evidences a dangerous condition where smoking actually reprograms the cells surrounding the cancer cells and triggers HNSCC aggressiveness.

Published recently in Molecular Cancer Research, the research showcases the true dangers of smoking associated with Head and Neck cancer.

Head and Neck Cancer

It is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. The great majority of cases are head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), cancer that originates in the outer layer of the skin and mucous membranes of the mouth, nose, and throat. Cigarette smoking as been known as a major risk factor for developing the disease and reducing treatment effectiveness.

Investigator Comment

Dr. Ubaldo Martinez-Outschoorn, MD associate professor Department of Medical Oncology and researcher at the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Health noted “Cigarette smoke changes the metabolism of cells in the head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, making the tumors efficient as an ecosystem to promote cancer growth.

Lead Research/Investigator

Dr. Ubaldo Martinez-Outschoorn, MD associate professor Department of Medical Oncology and researcher at the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Health

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