Social Determinants of Health Matter: Assure a Healthier Heart by Earning More Income

Nov 13, 2019 |  Social Determinants of Health, Cardiovascular, Heart Disease, Heart Health

Social Determinants of Health Matter Assure a Healthier Heart by Earning more Income

The social determinants of health matter.  In yet another affirmation of this reality, researchers from America and Israel study the association between bidirectional income change and cardiovascular disease. The team evidenced that as income drops over a 6 year period an individual’s cardiovascular risk substantially increases. What are the implications for cardiovascular-focused clinical research?

The Study

Published in JAMA Cardiology, the research team found that individuals that have experienced substantial income loss will likely suffer heart troubles over those that are earning more money. The team looked at data of nearly 9,000 patients over two decades of activity from four sections of America.

For example those whose income declined 50% or more are at greater risk (17%) of heart troubles. Follow the link to a CBS news special on this study.

Of course, doctors believe that a number of contributory elements are associated including diet, stress and behaviors (e.g. smoking or drinking). Additionally, behavioral health conditions, such as depression, could be correlated with heart problems.

SDoH

As the precision health movement gains momentum researchers will increasingly factor in the social determinants of health as important contributors to the subject’s holistic health care. Presently, clinical research needs to become more diversified when it comes to participants. For certain therapeutic indications this becomes critically important. The SDoHs may change depending on country, region or local population.

Lead Research/Investigators

  • Stephen Y Wang, MPH, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Andy S.L. Tan, MD, PhD, MPH, MBA, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Brian Claggett, PhD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Alvin Chandra, MD, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Sameed Ahmed M Khatana, MD, Penn Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine
  • Pamela L Lutsey, PhD, MPH, University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Minneapolis
  • Anna Kucharska-Newton, PhD, University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, Chapel Hill
  • Silvia Koton, PhD, School of Health Professions, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
  • Scott D. Solomon, MD, MPH, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Ichiro Kawachi, MD, PhD, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
Source: JAMA Network

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