Kyoto University Transfers CAR T-cell Therapy to Takeda for Phase I Clinical Trials

Aug 7, 2019 | CAR T-Cell, iPSC

Kyoto University Transfers CAR T-cell Therapy to Takeda for Phase I Clinical Trials

Kyoto University Center for iPS Cell Research and Application has transferred a new chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to Takeda for Phase I clinical trial.

Terms

Under the terms of their collaborative deal, Takeda will retain the rights to develop and commercialize the product worldwide, while CiRA will be eligible to receive royalties for each development and approval of milestone achieved, reports Immuno-Oncology News.  Both parties are optimistic of the prospect of the first iCART clinical trial in 2021.

What is Autologous CAR T-cell therapy?

It is a type of immunotherapy in which researchers collect a patient’s T-cells (immune cells with anti-cancer activity) and engineer them to recognize and eliminate cancer cells. The treated cells are then returned to the patient to fight the tumor.

What were Challenges with this Approach?

The first generation autologous CAR T-cell therapies required researchers to collect blood samples from patients to isolate their own T-cells, making the process extremely slow and expensive.

What is the iCART?

The iPSC-derived CAR T-cell product (iCART) is a new type of CAR T-cell therapy based on the use of a cell bank of identical master IPS cells—fully matured cells that can be reprogrammed back to a stem cell state where they are able to grow into any type of cell.

What is iCART Value Proposition?

Unlike a patient’s own T cells, IPS cells can be an immediate and renewable source for the large-scale and cost-effective production of off-the-shelf CAR-T therapies that can be adapted to suit each patient’s needs. So far, preclinical studies with iCART in animal models have shown these engineered cells have a strong anti-tumor activity.

Who developed the iCART program?

Originally this program was developed by Shin Kaneko, MD, PhD, a researcher at CiRA and a Takeda advisor.

What is T-CIRA?

A joint program between Takeda and Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA) that will change the future of medicine using iPS cells.

Kyoto University Center for iPS Cell Research (CiRA) 

The Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University, engages in research activity towards its mission of achieving the clinical application of iPS cells. It has set itself four related goals to achieve by the year 2030

Lead Research/Investigator for T-CiRA

Shinya Yamanaka, MD 

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