Kaiser Permanente Research Evidences Pertussis Vaccine Loses Efficacy Over Time

Jun 21, 2019 | Pertussis, Real-world data, Vaccines

Pertussis

Kaiser Permanente Northern California research reveals that the pertussis (whooping cough) vaccine my lose efficacy over time.

The Study

Led by Kaiser’s Vaccine Study Center and published in Pediatrics, the team retrospectively analyzed electronic health records of 469,982 children ages 3 months to 11 years old.  The data points include: out of 738 identified cases, 515 were in fully vaccinated patients, as well as 88 patients who were fully vaccinated plus one dose. A total of 99 cases were unvaccinated and 36 were under vaccinated, reports ContagionLive.

Presently the diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine is administered three times to babies, then twice as boosters to young children. Tdap is the adult equivalent of DTaP, administered once to preteens and every 10 years to adults—not to mention during the third trimester of pregnancy. Before the vaccine, in the 1940s, about 200,000 children fell ill and 9,000 died from whooping cough annually.

Results

Based on the results of this new study, being unvaccinated definitely raised the risk levels for pertussis, which was 13 times higher among unvaccinated compared with fully vaccinated children and 1.9 times higher among under vaccinated children.

However, the risk for vaccinated patients increased dramatically as time elapsed since each patient’s diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTAP) vaccination.  Nevertheless, the risk for vaccinated patients increased dramatically as time elapsed since each patient’s diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTAP) vaccination. Among vaccinated children ages 19 to < 84 months, pertussis risk was 5 times higher (adjusted HR 5.04; 95% CI: 1.84–13.80) ≥3 years versus < 1 year after vaccination. Among children aged 84-132 months, risk was more than 2 times greater (adjusted HR 2.32; 95% CI: 0.97–5.59) ≥ 6 years versus < 3 years after vaccination.

Comments

The Kaiser team raises suspicions of waning effectiveness for the pertussis vaccine have been shared by many in healthcare for some time. Other recent studies have revealed risks in the vaccine—follow the link to read the entire ContagionLive article.

Lead Research/Investigator

Ousseny Zerbo, PhD, Staff Scientist

0 Comments

Pin It on Pinterest