Icahn School of Medicine Study Shows Urinary Tract Infection May Confer Greater Stroke Odds

Jun 27, 2019 | Infection, Real World Evidence, Stroke

Strokes and Infections

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and colleagues investigated exposure to infection in different organ systems in different periods before the acute ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage. They found that stroke can be triggered by infections.

Infection, most prominently urinary tract infection, was associated with elevated risk for acute ischemic stroke and Mt. Sinai reports the findings in Stroke, reports Healio.

The Study

The research team analyzed data from the New York State Inpatient and Emergency Department databases between 2006 and 2013. Hospitalizations for acute ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage, as well as ED visits and hospitalizations for infections of the skin, urinary tract, abdomen and respiratory system, as well as septicemia, were identified by the team.

The Results

They found that in a seven-day window, the strongest association was between urinary tract infection and acute ischemic stroke. (OR = 5.32; 95% CL, 3.69-7.68), the researchers noted. To a lesser extent urinary tract infection was associated with intracerebral hemorrhage at 14 days (OR = 1.8; 85% CL, 1.04-3.11) and 120 days (OR = 1.54; 95% CL, 1.23-1.94). The team noted that skin infections, septicemia and respiratory infections were also associated with intracerebral hemorrhage.

Lead Research/Investigators

Solly Sebastian, BS, department of neurology, Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai

Madip Dhamoon, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology, Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai

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