Dr. Peter McCullough Talks About at Home Treatments for COVID-19

Nov 4, 2020 | Digital Media, Podcast, Popular Posts

TSN Podcast

Dr. Peter McCullough sits down to talk with TrialSite News about Pathophysiologic Rationale for Early Ambulatory Treatment for COVID-19 as an Emergency Response to the Pandemic. Dr. McCullough is board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine in internal medicine and cardiovascular disease. He has a Masters in Public Health in Epidemiology. Dr. McCullough is an internationally recognized authority on the evaluation of medical evidence concerning contemporary issues in medicine and has published widely with more than 1000 publications and 500 citations in the National Library of Medicine. He has been a leader in the medical response to the COVID-19 disaster and has published the first guidance for the medical treatment of ambulatory patients infected with SARS-CoV-2. And, he has published a widely read OPED series on COVID-19 in TheHill.

More on Dr. McCullough below:

TSN Article

YouTube Presentation 

Baylor University Medical Center

PODCAST

3 Comments

  1. william mccarthy

    Early treatment makes perfect sense. If you get bitten by a rattlesnake, they don’t send you home without treatment to see if you die or not???

    Is it legal for you to prescribe those drugs that require a prescription? Better yet, can you sell a packet for at-home treatment?

    • Sheila Kingston

      I think the idea of early home care treatment is fantastic. I work in Primary Care & feel so helpless telling positive Covid 19 patients to just self isolate at home. I do recommend Vit & D K2 & the other supplements they can get over the counter but HCQ can only be prescribed now in hospitals.

  2. RICK KEIZER MD

    Our college, starting in July, put together Covid-kits for any Covid-19 patient/student who desires one. We endeavored to keep it simple and were cautious in dosing. The dose recommendation is to take the 4 components twice daily for 7 days. The kit is prepackaged in a blister pack 4 wide and 14 rows deep, each row has 2000 IU vit D3, 500 mg Vit C, 50 mg Zinc and 500 mg NAC. (Kudos to our pharmacy for inventing these.)

    We felt it irresponsible to send patients/students into isolation at the same time as we thought it appropriate for them to acquire multiple OTC supplements, right?

    So, should primary care providers be asking their regular patients who have not yet been infected to stock up on 4-6 OTC treatments? Should PCPs be analyzing their patients’ diets for likelihood of deficiency of organic sulfur (for making glutathione, consider a homocysteine level), zinc or magnesium or vitamin C and looking at their suntans (get a Vitamin D level maybe)? Assessing their risk of fatty liver or poor cardiovascular conditioning (check a CRP)? No governmental agency or medical association seems to be promoting a pro-active approach. Is it reasonable?

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