Children with Immigrant Dads Suffer PTSD Disproportionately

May 14, 2019 | Intergenerational Transmission of Trauma, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, PTSD

Immigrant Children

The social determinants of health significantly impact the whole person.  For example, a recent University of Turku, Finland study reveals that children with immigrant father are more likely to suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

The Finish investigators studied 3,639 children born in Finland between 1987 and 2012 who had been diagnosed with PTSD.  They found that those who had an immigrant father were twice as likely to diagnosed with PTSD than those with two Finnish parents.  Treating the whole person must become infused into care and in school counseling—in norther Europe (or at least in Finland) they should become more aware of the intergenerational transmission of trauma.

The study results are conveyed that PTSD risk was two times higher among children with immigrant fathers born in North Africa or the Middle East.  Evidence of intergenerational transmission of trauma is real. For example Dr. Andre Sourander, professor of psychiatry from the University of Turku offered up increasing evidence of interregional transmission of trauma among holocaust survivors, veterans and refugee.

Lead Research/Investigator

Sanju Silwal, Research Centre for Child Psychiatry, University of Turku

Dr. Andre Sourander, professor of psychiatry from the University Pof Turku

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