Amgen, Cytokinetics and Servier Report Topline Data from Phase 3 GALACTIC-HF Trial of omecamtiv mecarbil in Patients with Heart Failure

Oct 16, 2020 | Cardiovascular, Challenging Results, News

Amgen, Cytokinetics and Servier Report Topline Data from Phase 3 GALACTIC-HF Trial of omecamtiv mecarbil in Patients with Heart Failure

Amgen, Cytokinetics and Servier announced topline results from GALACTIC-HF, a Phase 3 pivotal clinical trial of omecamtiv mecarbil in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The trial met the primary composite endpoint of reduction in cardiovascular death or heart failure events but did not meet the secondary endpoint of reduction in cardiovascular death. Additional analyses of data are underway and results from GALACTIC-HF will be presented at the American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2020, in a virtual Late Breaking Clinical Trial session on Friday, November 13, 2020 from 10:35-10.45 a.m. CDT.

GALACTIC-HF was a global double-blind, placebo-controlled, event-driven cardiovascular outcomes study conducted in 8,256 patients with HFrEF, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II-IV, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤35%, elevated natriuretic peptides and either current hospitalization for heart failure or history of hospitalization or emergency department visit for heart failure within a year. Patients were randomized to either oral placebo or a starting dose of 25 mg omecamtiv mecarbil twice daily (maintenance dose of 50 mg, 37.5 mg, or 25 mg twice daily) guided by pharmacokinetic-guided dose selection. 

The primary composite endpoint was time to CV death or first heart failure event (heart failure hospitalization and other urgent treatment for heart failure). The primary secondary endpoint was time to CV death. 

The results of GALACTIC-HF show that treatment with omecamtiv mecarbil achieved the primary composite efficacy endpoint and demonstrated a statistically significant effect to reduce cardiovascular (CV) death or heart failure events (heart failure hospitalization and other urgent treatment for heart failure) compared to placebo in patients treated with standard of care. No reduction in the secondary endpoint of CV death was observed. Adverse events, including major ischemic cardiac events, were balanced between treatment arms. 

About Omecamtiv mecarbil

Omecamtiv mecarbil is a selective cardiac myosin activator, the first of a novel class of myotropes designed to directly target the contractile mechanisms of the heart, binding to and recruiting more cardiac myosin heads to interact with actin during systole. Preclinical research has shown that omecamtiv mecarbil increases cardiac contractility without increasing intracellular myocyte calcium concentrations or myocardial oxygen consumption. Cardiac myosin is the cytoskeletal motor protein in the cardiac muscle cell that is directly responsible for converting chemical energy into the mechanical force resulting in cardiac contraction. 

Omecamtiv mecarbil is being developed for the potential treatment of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) under a collaboration between Amgen and Cytokinetics, with funding and strategic support from Servier. A phase 3 trial referred to as METEORIC-HF (Multicenter Exercise Tolerance Evaluation of Omecamtiv Mecarbil Related to Increased Contractility in Heart Failure) is underway to evaluate the effect of treatment with omecamtiv mecarbil compared to placebo on exercise capacity.

About Heart Failure

Heart failure affects more than 64 million people worldwide about half of whom have reduced left ventricular function. It is the leading cause of hospitalization and readmission in people age 65 and older. Despite broad use of standard treatments and advances in care, the prognosis for patients with heart failure is poor. An estimated one in five people over the age of 40 are at risk of developing heart failure, and approximately 50 percent of people diagnosed with heart failure will die within five years of initial hospitalization.

Source: Cytokinetics

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